The principle and application of a new type of photoelectric sensor


Release time:

2023-11-26

With the increasing level of automation in global manufacturing, industrial sensors have become the key to improving production capacity and enhancing safety. Industrial sensors come in various sizes, shapes, and technologies - the most common being sensors designed using inductive, capacitive, optoelectronic, magnetic, and ultrasonic technologies. Each technology has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it is necessary to determine which sensor to use based on the requirements of the application.

With the increasing level of automation in global manufacturing, industrial sensors have become the key to improving production capacity and enhancing safety. Industrial sensors come in various sizes, shapes, and technologies - the most common being sensors designed using inductive, capacitive, optoelectronic, magnetic, and ultrasonic technologies. Each technology has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it is necessary to determine which sensor to use based on the requirements of the application.

Optoelectronic sensors are widely used in detection and control. There are various optical measurement and control systems made based on the different principles of the action of optical flux on optoelectronic components. According to the output properties of optoelectronic components (optical measurement and control systems), they can be divided into two categories: analog optoelectronic sensors and pulse (switch) optoelectronic sensors. This article focuses on introducing the composition, characteristics, usage, and related application examples of the new analog photoelectric sensor in the industrial control picking and measuring system.

An analog photoelectric sensor converts the measured light current into a continuously changing light current, and it has a single value relationship with the measured light. Analog photoelectric sensors can be divided into three categories based on the method of measurement (detecting target objects): transmission (absorption) type, diffuse reflection type, and shading type (beam blocking). The so-called transmissive type refers to the light energy emitted by a constant light source passing through the object being measured, partially absorbed, and then projected onto the photoelectric element when the object is placed in the optical path; The so-called diffuse reflection refers to the light emitted by a constant light source being projected onto the object being measured, and then reflected off the surface of the object before being projected onto the photoelectric element; The so-called shading type refers to when a portion of the light flux emitted by the light source is blocked by the measured object, causing a change in the light flux projected onto the photoelectric element. The degree of change is related to the position of the measured object in the optical path.